Mr Supps
  • Amused
  • Angry
  • Annoyed
  • Awesome
  • Bemused
  • Cocky
  • Cool
  • Crazy
  • Crying
  • Depressed
  • Down
  • Drunk
  • Embarrased
  • Enraged
  • Friendly
  • Geeky
  • Godly
  • Happy
  • Hateful
  • Hungry
  • Innocent
  • Meh
  • Piratey
  • Poorly
  • Sad
  • Secret
  • Shy
  • Sneaky
  • Tired
  • Wtf
  • Results 1 to 5 of 5

    Thread: STRONGER MUSCLES = Less chance of Alzheimer's

    1. #1
      JerkKILLER's Avatar
      JerkKILLER is offline Platinum Member
      Points: 10,724, Level: 68
      Level completed: 69%, Points required for next Level: 126
      Overall activity: 99.9%
      Achievements:
      Three FriendsVeteran10000 Experience Points
      This user has no status.
       
      I am:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2007
      Location
      West side
      Posts
      1,006
      Post Thanks / Like
      Points
      10,724
      Level
      68
      Rep Power
      12

      Default STRONGER MUSCLES = Less chance of Alzheimer's

      Found this on the news tonight, definitely one more reason EVERYBODY should be lifting weights regularly

      ---------------------------------

      Mon Nov 9, 5:20 pm ET
      NEW YORK (Reuters Health)


      Older people with stronger muscles are at reduced risk of developing Alzheimer's disease compared to their weaker peers, a new study shows.

      Dr. Patricia A. Boyle of Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center in Chicago and her colleagues found that the greater a person's muscle strength, the lower their likelihood of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's over a four-year period. The same was true for the loss of mental function that often precedes full-blown Alzheimer's.

      Studies have linked grip strength to Alzheimer's, while a person's weight and level of physical activity also influence risk of the disease. To date, however, no one has studied whether muscle strength in and of itself might play a role in dementia risk, Boyle and her team note in November's Annals of Neurology.

      "These findings support the link between physical health and cognition in aging and the importance of maintaining good physical function and strength," Boyle told Reuters Health via E-mail.

      The researchers measured the strength of nine muscle groups in the arms and legs of 970 dementia-free men and women 54 to 100 years old (their average age was around 80). They also tested the strength of study participants' breathing muscles.

      During follow-up, which lasted about four years, 138 people developed Alzheimer's. These individuals were older and had worse mental function than the rest of the study participants. They also were weaker.

      But even after the researchers adjusted for age and education level-which can influence Alzheimer's risk-they found that muscle strength had a strong influence on the risk of the disease. People who ranked in the top 10 percent for muscle strength were 61 percent less likely to develop Alzheimer's than the weakest 10 percent. Stronger people also showed a slower decline in their mental abilities over time.

      The relationship between muscle strength and mild mental difficulties, which occurred in an additional 275 people, was similar, with the strongest 10 percent being at 48 percent lower risk than the weakest 10 percent.

      When the researchers looked at different types of muscle strength separately, they found that grip strength and breathing-muscle strength had an independent effect on Alzheimer's risk, but arm and leg strength didn't.

      The most likely explanation for the mental function-muscle strength link is that there is something going in the body that causes both muscle weakness and loss of mental ability, Boyle said.

      While the study couldn't show whether keeping one's muscles strong will keep Alzheimer's at bay, staying fit is a good idea-and good for the brain-no matter what, according to Boyle.

      "We certainly think that it is important to be physically active and to work to keep our muscles strong," she said. "Good physical health is important for good brain function."

      SOURCE: Archives of Neurology, November 2009.

    2. #2
      gator_mclusky is offline Banned
      Points: 5,353, Level: 47
      Level completed: 2%, Points required for next Level: 197
      Overall activity: 1.0%
      Achievements:
      Recommendation First ClassVeteran5000 Experience Points
      This user has no status.
       
      I am:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Nov 2008
      Posts
      0
      Post Thanks / Like
      Points
      5,353
      Level
      47
      Rep Power
      0

      Default

      Another good reason to lift. Alzheimer's literally make one go crazy......

      gator

    3. #3
      meatt is offline Member
      Points: 2,989, Level: 33
      Level completed: 60%, Points required for next Level: 61
      Overall activity: 1.0%
      Achievements:
      1000 Experience PointsVeteran
      This user has no status.
       
      I am:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Sep 2009
      Posts
      55
      Post Thanks / Like
      Points
      2,989
      Level
      33
      Rep Power
      9

      Default

      Great post bro, keeping that in the back of your mind will help keep a man motivated throughout the years.

    4. #4
      JerkKILLER's Avatar
      JerkKILLER is offline Platinum Member
      Points: 10,724, Level: 68
      Level completed: 69%, Points required for next Level: 126
      Overall activity: 99.9%
      Achievements:
      Three FriendsVeteran10000 Experience Points
      This user has no status.
       
      I am:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2007
      Location
      West side
      Posts
      1,006
      Post Thanks / Like
      Points
      10,724
      Level
      68
      Rep Power
      12

      Default

      Yeah lets hope so.

      But u know how some people are.. "U can lead the horse to water.."
      or my personal favorite "You can tell a fat guy to stay off the sweets..."

      LOL

    5. #5
      DuG is offline Member
      Points: 2,893, Level: 32
      Level completed: 96%, Points required for next Level: 7
      Overall activity: 1.0%
      Achievements:
      1000 Experience PointsVeteran
      This user has no status.
       
      I am:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Oct 2009
      Posts
      35
      Post Thanks / Like
      Points
      2,893
      Level
      32
      Rep Power
      0

      Default

      the Alzheimer's afraid of big muscles ...joke...good read

    Thread Information

    Users Browsing this Thread

    There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    GearPro